A Win for Alabamians

Know what you're eating.

Support our local seafood workers.

Restaurants and grocery stores must now identify all seafood as “imported” or “domestic”

The Seafood Labeling Bill has passed the Alabama State Senate and is poised to be signed into law. The bill requires the labeling of “imported” versus “domestic” for seafood at restaurants and grocery stores, as well as the designating of “wild-caught” versus “farm-raised” on all seafood sold.

The bill was carried in the house by State Rep. Chip Brown (R – Hollinger’s Island) and in the Senate by David Sessions (R – Grand Bay).

“We are very thankful and excited that the law is changing and is supporting our seafood industry,” said Kerry Mitchell, secretary of the Alabama Commercial Fishermen Association. “We appreciate all the support from the community, state legislature, and many others, including Mobile Baykeeper. This is a great step in getting an even playing field for our shrimp industry. Now, consumers can be more aware of what seafood they are purchasing and consuming.”

Foreign shrimp account for 94 percent of the U.S. market, and local shrimpers in Alabama have had their livelihood in recent years threatened by the “dumping” of foreign shrimp. The Seafood Labeling Bill gives our local seafood workers a fighting chance and lets you know where your seafood is coming from.

Last year, the shrimping crisis had grown so dire the city of Bayou La Batre issued a Declaration of Disaster. Henry Barnes, the town’s mayor, said the Seafood Capital of Alabama was in danger of becoming a ghost town due to the moribund state of the shrimping industry.

“Imported seafood has been decimating our neighbors’ ability to make a living,” said William Strickland, executive director at Mobile Baykeeper. “Imports undercut the price of Alabama harvested seafood, causing generational commercial fishing families to suffer. However, foreign, farmed seafood is not the preference of most consumers. We are grateful to Representative Chip Brown for putting the choice in our hands on what kind of seafood we want to eat. Now, let’s get to work on protecting habitat so we have more shrimp to catch.”

Read “Born on the Bayou: Generational Shrimpers Say Industry is Facing Existential Threat” from Mobile Baykeeper’s CURRENTS, and “A Seat at the Table: Salty Pirates Seafood Wants to Give Alabama Seafood Workers a Voice” for more background on the shrimping crisis that has plagued Gulf Coast shrimpers.

For interview requests, please contact Caine O’Rear at corear@mobilebaykeeper.org, or at 615-975-5777.


YOU supported local seafood workers. And that’s worth celebrating.

Because of your support Seafood Labeling bill has passed the senate and will soon be signed into law. This will require the labeling of imported or domestic for seafood at restaurants and grocery stores as well as clearly labeling “wild-caught” versus “farm-raised” seafood.

Until now foreign shrimp account for 94% of the market and local shrimpers in Alabama are put out of work by the flood of cheap, farmed, foreign shrimp. The Seafood Labeling Bill gives our local seafood workers a fighting chance and allows you to know where your seafood is coming from.

We are incredibly grateful to State Rep. Chip Brown and Senator David Sessions for their leadership.

The 2024 Seafood Labeling Bill will:

  • Require the labeling of imported or domestic for seafood at restaurants and grocery stores
  • Require the labeling of “wild-caught” versus “farm-raised” seafood

UPDATE (5/8/2024) The Seafood Labeling Bill has passed the Alabama State Senate. We are incredibly grateful to State Rep. Chip Brown and Senator David Sessions for their leadership.

UPDATE (2/29/24) The Seafood Labeling Bill has passed the Alabama House of Representatives. We’d like to thank State Rep. Chip Brown (R – Hollinger’s Island) for carrying this important measure forward to help support our local seafood workers.

UPDATE (2/22/24) Representative Chip Brown’s bill (HB66) passed committee in the House and will go to the floor for a vote. The amended bill mandates the labeling of seafood as either domestic or imported and requires identification of seafood as wild-caught or farm-raised. While the requirement for using correct species names on seafood labels has been removed, we believe the bill still represents a significant step forward in promoting transparency and supporting our local seafood industry. A companion bill will be introduced in the Senate in the coming days by State Sen. David Sessions (R-Grand Bay).

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